Introduction

Many images of the very same region allow a determination of size and height of landscape characteriscs.

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Famous Images

Famous Images

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Scaling

Scaling

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Comparing Results

Comparing Results

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Famous Images

Written by Super User. Posted in Paragraph

Over a period of 31 years five prominent images of the famous mesa have been made and published. The image with the highest Resolution was taken with the camera of the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) on April 7, 2007. The label of this image is PSP_003234_2210, and was taken from zenith of the mountain, so this image is a Nadir Image and can be used for photogrammetric Survey and is shown first. Going back in time and to lower resolution, the second and third image both were taken by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) in 2001 and 1998, both also in April. Their labels are PIA03225 and SP1-22003. The fourth image is 35A72 taken by Viking Orbiter A or 1 and the image, it’s label and the date when it was taken are very well known. A similar resolution as the picture of 1976 is achieved by an image of Cydonia region taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) from Mars Express (MEX) in 2006. A section of this wide range colour image with label 306-230906-3253 is shown for completeness as fifth image.

 

PSP_003234_2210

The original nadir image PSP_003234_2210_RED_NOMAP.jp2 consists of 20048 x 15000 pixels, each pixel averagely representing an area of 29.9cm x 29.9cm. This Image has a size of 180 MB in compressed JP2000-Format. In non-compressed TIFF-Format it takes nearly 1 GB (881 MB), which MS-Paint can not handle on usual PCs (use Irfan View). A smaller Version of size 1.5 MB in jpeg-Format is used for common purpose. PSP_003234_2210_RED_NOMAP.browse.jpg consists of 2048 x 1532 Pixels. The factor for reduction of width is 20048/2048, which is ~ 9.79. Reducing the height by this factor we get 1532.3224 for the correct height in pixel. The Resolution of the small Version is thus 2.93m per pixel. Both images cover a region of 5994,35m x 4485,00m

Based on this picture three following elementary properties of the mountain can be fixed: It’s length takes 920 pixels (á 2.927m) in the image, representing 2692 m (1.673 miles) ~ 2.7 km, and it’s width takes 630 pixels in the image, representing 1885 m (1,171 miles) ~ 1.9 km, giving an aspect ratio of 1.428 for length to width. The square of the aspect ratio is nearly 2 (1.428 x 1.428 = 2.04), so the aspect ratio is near √2.

 

PIA03225

 

 

6 years before, in April 2001, Mars Global Surveyor took image PIA03225, which shows the lower edges in the same way. But because the orbiter was not in the zenith of the mountain during the exposure, the higher parts in the landform, including the upper edges of the slopes, are shifted to the left, the more the higher they are. PIA03225 has 2400 x 2400 pixels and a resolution of 1.5m per pixel. On this picture the mountain’s length is 1813 pixels, representing 2719 m and the mountain width is 1270 pixels, representing 1905 m.

 

SP1-22003

 

The third image was photographed also by MGS but another three years before in 1998. It shows the mesa in a slanted perspective from an angle of nearly 45 degrees. It has a size of 1024 x 1121 pixels with a resolution of 4.3 m per pixel. The length of both axes on the ground has to be calculated with different factors. Pixels in x-direction from left to right count with factor 1 but in y-direction from bottom top the projection onto the ground has to be considered and the y-difference is divided by cos(45°) which means the number of pixels in y-direction has to be multiplied by √2. Based on such calculation, the mountains length takes 626.8 pixels, representing 2695 m and the mountains width takes 442.2 pixels, representing 1901m.

 

35A72

 

The fourth image 35A72 from Viking orbiter A is the oldest, photographed in 1976 in it's 35th orbit as image 72. The mountains length takes 39.2 pixels on the original image, representing 1842 m and the mountains width takes 56 pixels, representing 2632 m.

  

300-230906-3253

 

 

The Mars Express orbiter with it's High Resolution Stereo Camera acquired data in the Cydonia region between April 2004 and July 2006 multiple times. High flight altitudes as well as dust and haze in the Martian atmosphere resulted in a poor data resolution on the ground. But on July 22, 2006 the HRSC-Experiment was successful in orbit 3253 and took image 230906 [5]. It was published in 2007 and is now found in “HRSC Produktserie #300 - Cydonia Orbit 3253”. There are also stereo pictures available, but these are wide range photographs and have only little recognizable 3D effects. On picture 230906 the mountain’s length is 154 pixels and it's width 109 pixels. The mentioned page states a resolution of 13.7 meters per pixel. According to the results of the other pictures, a digit transposition of 3 and 7 in the stated resolution is presumed and as correct specification 17.3 meters per pixel are assumed, giving a length of 2664 m and a width of 1885 m.

 

 

Wellcome!

We are pleased to welcome you on our homepage. Be informed on our online presence about research and results regarding the famous mountain on Mars in Cydonia Mensae region. As an oronym we continue to use the term 'Face of Mars', although the mesa only looked on the first fotos taken from it like face, lying half in shadow. These pictures are not a good example for pareidolia, the appearance of a face on the very first pictures is obvious. This does not apply for newer fotos, they do not show the appearance of a face. Only people who mean to identify a face on newer fotos may labour under pareidolia. But nevertheless the mesa has more properties, which are not usual for naturally formed mountains ...

Take a look around!                             Or ask a question: talk@mountains-on-mars-in-3d.net